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The Diamond Fund

University of Hertfordshire student Josie Sultan, decided to use an internship in China as a way to stand out to employers. Here she explains the process for applying for The Diamond Fund, a source of funding for University of Hertfordshire students.

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Once I found the internship opportunities available in China, I knew I had to be a part of it, I just didn’t know how I was going to fund it. Luckily I had the opportunity to save some money from my work placement year, but not enough to fund two months in China. Finding funding was fundamental.

I first found out about the Diamond Fund in my second year of University when a friend of mine decided to apply for funding. However, I never really researched it or knew any of the steps of the application process. That was when I started to look at all the information provided on StudyNet. Once I gathered all the information I needed, I listed the important steps needed to submit a successful application.

Step 1: Find someone to reference your application

This was one of the trickiest steps when applying for the Diamond Fund. I knew the reference needed to be someone respected and relatable to my application. Picking my current employer would be too easy and predictable, but picking someone who my application could benefit would truly convey the importance of the funding. After much consideration, I asked the Careers and Placement team within the University to support my application. Not only were they able to help provide an excellent reference, they assisted me with the content of my application. This brings me to step 2.

Step 2: Completing the written sections on the application form

At a first glance, the application form seemed quite simple to complete with just 3 sections to write and a breakdown of the cost of the project, but once I started to complete the form, I knew I would need to draft and redraft the answers. Each section has a certain word limit, and keeping to the word limit is a necessity as again, it shows you have seen the instruction and abided by the limit. I found it extremely difficult to include all the reasons why I should be awarded funding and stick to the word count, so I decided to seek help from the Careers and Placements team. They provided me with a one-on-one session where they detailed the importance of some points on where to expand further and where to remove unnecessary information. I strongly suggest you use the workshops and advice provided to you by the Careers and Placements team.

Step 3: Working out budgets and specific costs

This section is possibly the most important section and could be the decision as to whether you make it through the first round or not. I knew it was extremely important to be specific and precise with the costs of each section of my internship.

Now here’s a quick tip: make sure you read the guidance notes thoroughly. They clearly state all the certain aspects that they can provide funding for and those that they simply do not. For example, they do not fund accommodation and travel. Make sure you ask for the right funding otherwise you’re just showing you did not pay attention to the details.

Step 4: Submit the application

Working within the University of Hertfordshire, I knew how competitive this funding was and how specific the board can be with allocating funds to specific projects. I knew being awarded was a long shot, but you never get it unless you try…luckily for me, I not only tried, I succeeded.

 

Josie Sultan is a current student at the University of Hertfordshire.

Josie Sultan is a current student at the University of Hertfordshire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo credit: jDevaun via photopin cc

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